Resilience

Break the Cycle - Starting Today

Professional Education Conference & public education events

You are cordially invited to attend a special screening of  Resilience: The Biology of Stress & The Science of Hope the award winning documentary that chronicles the birth of a new movement among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities, who are using cutting-edge brain science to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease.

    What is the Resilience Documentary?

    RESILIENCE is a one-hour documentary that delves into the science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the birth of a new movement to treat and prevent toxic stress. Experts now believe that toxic stress is one of the leading causes of everything from heart disease and cancer to substance abuse and depression. These extremely stressful experiences in childhood can alter brain development and have lifelong effects on health and behavior. RESILIENCE chronicles this new approach among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities who are using cutting-edge science to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease. 

    Professional Education Conference

    The Professional Education Conference will kick off with the film screening hosted by director James Redford. Workgroup sessions will follow throughout the day to discuss breaking the cycle of adversity and responding as a trauma informed community.  The event is scheduled from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm.

    We invite all educators, counselors, law enforcement, mental and behavioral health care professionals, etc. to attend the event. Those who are looking to receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) will receive a certificate of attendance at the end of the day to apply toward your CEUs as required by your professional field.

    Special guests include: 

    James Redford - James started his collaboration with Karen Pritzker on HBO’s The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia, a film that gave hope to millions of families around the world who have struggled to educate their dyslexic children. From there, they turned their story telling eye on the hidden menace of adverse childhood experiences with two documentaries—Paper Tigers and Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope.

    Jim Sporleder - Principal Sporleder was at the end of his rope trying to manage a high school riddled with violence and drugs. When he learns about the science of what stress does to a developing brain, he decides to completely overhaul the traditional model of discipline. 

     

     

     

    Community education events

    All film screenings will be accompanied by a panel discussion with local experts and allow for a public question and answer. Events are free and open to the public. We hope you can join us! 

    Screenings & Registration


    Screening Information:

    • Parents, teachers, providers and community members are invited to learn about the positive approaches of dealing with child and adolescent trauma and the effects that positive engagements have over punitive punishment. 
    • Admission is free and refreshments will be served. 
    • The film is 60 minutes long. Immediately following the film we will host a panel discussion with local experts and allow for a public question and answer.
    • The film will be shown with subtitles. 
    • The film is not rated. It might not be suitable for children.
    • These screenings are sponsored by Optum IdahoIdaho Federation of FamiliesIdaho Children's Trust Fund and The Speedy Foundation
    There are doctors, researchers, teachers, nurses, social workers and law enforcement officers that are turning the tide against the cycle of trauma and abuse. A movement is rising, one that sees aberrant behavior in children as a symptom rather than a moral failing. This movement asks not what is wrong with our youth, but rather what has happened to them. The paradigm is shifting from punishment and blame to a deeper commitment to understanding and healing the underlying causes of aberrant behavior. With this shifting paradigm comes the promise of great improvements in many of the society’s costly ills: less crime, less illness, less teen pregnancy, abuse, rape, divorce.

    Simply put, it is cheaper to heal than to punish.”
    — Prevent Child Abuse America

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

    More than two decades ago, two respected researchers, clinical physician Dr. Vincent Felitti and CDC epidemiologist Robert Anda, published the game-changing Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACEs.) It revealed a troubling but irrefutable phenomenon: the more traumatic experiences the respondents had as children (such as physical and emotional abuse and neglect), the more likely they were to develop health problems later in life—problems such as cancer, heart disease, and high blood pressure. To complicate matters, there was also a troubling correlation between adverse childhood experiences and prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse, unprotected sex, and poor diet. Combined, the results of the study painted a staggering portrait of the price our children are paying for growing up in unsafe environments, all the while adding fuel to the fire of some of society’s greatest challenges.

    "What's predictable is preventable." 

    However, this very same study contains the seed of HOPE: all of the above-mentioned risk factors—behavioral as well as physiological—can be offset by the presence of one dependable and caring adult. It doesn’t need to be the mother or the father. It doesn’t even need to be a close or distant relative. More often than not, that stable, caring adult is a teacher.

    Learn More → 

    Resilience is about overcoming adversity. It’s about how you think and how you view the world. When something bad happens to you, do you see it as a catastrophe? Or do you see it as an opporunity? Are you able to tell the difference between something that’s a real tiger versus something that just feels like a tiger.
    Because stress is designed into our bodies so that we can deal with the tiger that’s going to attack us. Right? And the key is that you have to be able to tell the difference between something that could really chew your face off, or just feels like it might.
    The resilience mindset can tell the difference between something real and something that only worries you.
    Unconditional love...it gives human beings the security that allows them to move forward and to take chances. That’s the bottom line of being able to handle almost anything.
    ’I am loved, I am valued, and people know who I am inside.’ That allows people to thrive through good and bad times and that’s what resilience is.
    — Kenneth Ginsberg, MD, Adolescent Medicine Specialist

    Resilience:  The biology of stress and the Science of Hope

    Examining the emerging science around Toxic Stress and how it negatively alters the brains and bodies of children if left untreated.

    "The child may not remember, but the body remembers."

    Researchers have recently discovered a dangerous biological syndrome caused by abuse and neglect during childhood. As the new documentary Resilience reveals, toxic stress can trigger hormones that wreak havoc on the brains and bodies of children, putting them at a greater risk for disease, homelessness, prison time, and early death. While the broader impacts of poverty worsen the risk, no segment of society is immune. Resilience, however, also chronicles the dawn of a movement that is determined to fight back. Trailblazers in pediatrics, education, and social welfare are using cutting-edge science and field-tested therapies to protect children from the insidious effects of toxic stress—and the dark legacy of a childhood that no child would choose. 

    Learn More →

     

    Paper Tigers

    Captures the pain, the danger and the hopes of struggling teens–and the teachers armed with new science who are changing their lives for the better. 

    “Stressed brains can’t learn.”

    The film follows a year in the life of an alternative high school that has radically changed its approach to disciplining its students, becoming a promising model for how to break the cycles of poverty, violence and disease that affect families.

    That was the nugget of neuroscience that Jim Sporleder, principal of a high school riddled with violence, drugs and truancy, took away from an educational conference in 2010. Three years later, the number of fights at Lincoln Alternative High School had gone down by 75% and the graduation rate had increased five-fold. Paper Tigers is the story of how one school made such dramatic progress.

    Following six students over the course of a school year, we see Lincoln’s staff try a new approach to discipline: one based on understanding and treatment rather than judgment and suspension. Using a combination of vérité and revealing diary cam footage, Paper Tigers is a testament to what the latest developmental science is showing: that just one caring adult can help break the cycle of adversity in a young person’s life.

    Learn More →

    When I started hearing about the emerging science of adversity and childhood stress, my mind was blown. High “doses” of stress during childhood get into our bodies, change our brains, and lead to lifelong health and social problems—everything from domestic violence and substance abuse to heart disease and cancer. Who knew that if your parents got a divorce when you were growing up, you have a significantly higher risk of heart disease? Or that if your mother had a drinking problem, your own risk for depression in adulthood is much higher? The science of “Toxic Stress” and the major findings that came out of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study should be common knowledge public health information. But the movement is still in its infancy.

    We started making RESILIENCE to make this science digestible and relevant to everyone, and to showcase some of the brave and creative individuals who are putting that science into action. There is a growing group of pediatricians, educators and communities who are proving that cycles of disease and adversity can be broken.

    In the United States, we spend trillions of dollars every year treating preventable diseases, rather than intervening before a patient is sick and suffering. We have a zero-tolerance, “suck it up” culture that judges and punishes bad behavior, rather than trying to understand and treat the root cause of that behavior. But now, with this new body of scientific knowledge available, we are learning there are better ways of dealing with these seemingly intractable problems.

    RESILIENCE has a companion film: PAPER TIGERS follows a year in the life of an alternative high school in Washington State who radically changed its approach to student discipline, with radically positive results. Our goal with these two projects is to make “Toxic Stress” and “ACEs” household terms, so that individuals and communities are empowered to improve the health and wellbeing of this and future generations.
    — James Redford, Director

    2016 'Paper Tigers' Screenings 

    We were honored to host special screenings of  Paper Tigers, the award winning documentary that explores the impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) and toxic stress on struggling teens, across the state of Idaho. 

    Screenings: 

    • Boise, ID: Wednesday, Oct. 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m. MDT
    • Idaho Falls, ID: Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m. MDT
      • In eastern Idaho there were 90 people in attendance, a majority of those included agencies, counselors, parents and providers. This particular area of the state has seen an increase in teen related suicides and because of that we had a handful of providers from Malad were in attendance, seeking information to take back to their community to help teens who are in crisis. The film screening happened that on the same evening there was a funeral for a teenager who had died by suicide over the weekend. 
    • Moscow, ID: Thursday, Sept. 29, 6:30-8:30 p.m. PDT
      • At this northern Idaho location there were 120 people in attenance with a large number of alternative high school students in the audience, as well as parents who have been in and out of the jail system. One parent made the comment that they were there because they wanted to learn how to break the cycle so that their children did not follow in their footsteps.
    • Nampa, ID: Wednesday, Sept. 21, 6:30-8:30 p.m. MDT

    What is the Paper Tigers Documentary?
    Paper Tigers follows a year in the life of an alternative high school that has radically changed its approach to disciplining its students and in the process has become a promising model for how to break the cycles of poverty, violence and disease that affect families. 

    Jim Sporleder, principal at Lincoln Alternative High School in Walla Walla, Washington, a school riddled with violence, drugs and truancy, discovered that stressed brains can’t learn. 

    Following six students over the course of a school year, Principal Sporleder and his staff tried a new approach to discipline. It was based on understanding and treatment rather than judgement and suspension. 

    Three years later, the number of fights at Lincoln Alternative High School were reduced by 75% and the graduation rate was dramatically increased. Paper Tigers is the story of how one school was able to make a dramatic change and how just one caring adult can help break the cycle of adversity in a young person’s life.