Black Dog Institute, LifeSpan literally saving lives through data analytics

Black Dog Institute, LifeSpan literally saving lives through data analytics

Suicide is a complex social issue which needs a whole-of-community approach. Learn more about PHN’s approach. This community-led approach is integral to building the capacity of people to greater support those facing a suicide crisis and helping people in the local community to be informed and better connected. This is an opportunity to have a significant and sustainable impact on suicide in the region. Anyone in the community can get involved and there are many ways to contribute such as undertaking online suicide prevention training and learning about what services and supports are available in the community.

Watch the video of people with a lived experience who share their stories.

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Black Dog Institute, LifeSpan literally saving lives through data analytics

Olympic Dreams

Olympic Dreams

Fiction:
The fictional storyline revolves around a young cross-country skier, Penelope (played by Alexi), and a volunteer in the Olympic Village, Ezra (played by Nick), who cross paths and form an unlikely relationship. Penelope and Ezra each have transformative experiences at the Games, returning home with a new outlook on life enriched by the Olympic values they have experienced.

Reality:
Alexi’s unique perspective as a current Olympic athlete results in films that portray the Olympic experience from the athlete’s point of view, in a way that has never been seen before. Athletes in competition like American freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy (the confidant), American cross-country skier Anne Hart (the stunt double) and American freestyle skier Morgan Schild (the team-mate) star in small acting roles and offer stellar performances! A first!

Watch Here

Taking Action, Saving Lives: Aspiring to a Zero Suicide Mindset

Taking Action, Saving Lives: Aspiring to a Zero Suicide Mindset

Have you met our friend Sally?

Sally Spencer-Thomas is a clinical psychologist, inspirational international speaker and an impact entrepreneur. Dr. Spencer-Thomas was moved to work in suicide prevention after her younger brother, a Denver entrepreneur, died of suicide after a difficult battle with bipolar condition. Known nationally and internationally as an innovator in social change, Spencer-Thomas has helped start up multiple large-scale, gap filling efforts in mental health, including the award-winning campaign Man Therapy and the nation’s first initiative for suicide prevention in the workplace.

She will be keynoting Lewiston’s “Taking Action, Saving Lives: Aspiring to a Zero Suicide Mindset” conference on April 15, 2019.

Register Here

NINE IN 10 YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE US ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THEIR MENTAL HEALTH, FINDS SURVEY

NINE IN 10 YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE US ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THEIR MENTAL HEALTH, FINDS SURVEY

“It's important that particularly young people, but actually everybody knows that everyone breaks. That it’s sort of part of life. That what you have to do at that point is acknowledge it and get help, if you’re lucky enough to be able to get that help. There is no shame in admitting that you can’t cope…ultimately there’s nothing to feel ashamed about. I think particularly with men there is a big feeling that you shouldn’t have these emotions and that you should be able to cope and you should be able to man up…men do have to acknowledge their emotions and they do have to talk about and it’s okay to cry, because you’re a human being.” - Kira Knightley

Watch Interview Here

Six in 10 of people surveyed admitted to struggling with mental health issues

Katie O'Malley, Independent

Nine in 10 young people in the US are concerned about their mental health, according to a national survey.

Conducted by consulting firm Benenson Strategy Group on behalf Lady Gaga's Born This Way Foundation, researchers undertook at 2,082 online interviews with 13-24 year olds from 28 January to 2 February 2019.

Nearly all those surveyed (88 per cent) said that mental health is a priority concern for them, but one in three felt they lacked reliable access to mental health resources.

The study found that 15 per cent of people said they discuss their mental health “often”, while almost half (49 per cent) admitted to “rarely” or “never” discussing the topic, and more than half (55 per cent) said they were stressed.

Shannon Decker & The Speedy Foundation

Shannon Decker & The Speedy Foundation

Idaho Speakeasy, Mike Turner, Jared Cozby, & Phil Mount

About the Speedy Foundation

Shannon Decker is the Executive Director of the Speedy Foundation and the Idaho Suicide Prevention Coalition. The Speedy Foundation was started in 2011 in memory of Shannon’s cousin, Olympic Freestyle skier and three time Olympian, Jeret Peterson. Jeret died a year after the Vancouver Olympics in which he had taken home a silver medal for USA. His death compelled Shannon and her family to help others affected by suicide. At Jeret’s memorial, Mayor Bieter approached the family and told them that Idaho was the only state in the USA that didn’t have a suicide prevention hotline. The family felt that the Speedy Foundation could help that cause by providing help with funding as well as using Jeret’s legacy to gain traction—something that Shannon feels he would have wanted. Since 2011, the hotline has evolved and Shannon says that they’ve added several different aspects. Besides campaigning in the legislature for important funding, Shannon says that education has been a primary focus for the foundation. The Speedy Foundation believes that education for the general public is a tremendously important piece of the puzzle that is often overlooked.

 Listen to the full Idaho Speakeasy interview: idahospeakeasy.com/shannon-decker

Bill to require 'mental health first aid' training for teachers

Bill to require 'mental health first aid' training for teachers

WNEM Saginaw

A new bill introduced by the Senate (Michigan) will require teachers to undergo mental health first aid training to recognize signs of mental distress and substance abuse in young children.

Watch News Cast Here

U.S. deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide hit highest level since record-keeping began

U.S. deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide hit highest level since record-keeping began

Jayne O'Donnell, USA TODAY

The number of deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide in 2017 hit the highest level since federal data collection started in 1999, according to an analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data by two public health nonprofits.

The national rate for deaths from alcohol, drugs and suicide rose from 43.9 to 46.6 deaths per 100,000 people in 2017, a 6 percent increase, the Trust for America's Health and the Well Being Trust reported Tuesday. That was a slower increase than in the previous two years, but it was greater than the 4 percent average annual increase since 1999.

Deaths from suicides rose from 13.9 to 14.5 deaths per 100,000, a 4 percent increase. That was double the average annual pace over the previous decade.

The Mind Inside: Episode One

The Mind Inside: Episode One

What does a #TraumaInformed school look like? How do #ACEs impact the world of education? Nebraska opens their school doors and shares a glimpse. Please watch this powerful 30 minute film, "The Mind Inside: Episode One."

WATCH HERE

“Everywhere we went for two years, schools were talking about the importance of mental health – from the need to the access of services, to the growing urgency of the issue,” Sally Nellson, director and executive producer shares. ​“We listened and started to explore.” 

The Mind Inside, an I Love Public Schools docuseries, explores the landscape of mental health issues in Nebraska schools. 

St. George parents look for answers after 5 teen suicides in Washington County

St. George parents look for answers after 5 teen suicides in Washington County

A spike in suicides in Washington County schools has parents looking for answers. According to the school district, they've seen five suicides this school year across all Washington County schools. (Photo: KUTV)

by Ginna Roe, KUTV

ST. GEORGE, Utah (KUTV) — A spike in suicides in Washington County schools has parents looking for answers.

According to the school district, they've seen five suicides this school year across all Washington County schools.

“We’ve got to do something," Monica Owens, a St. George mom, said.

Her daughter Jerica Bennion is a junior in high school. Just recently, Owens pulled Jerica out of public school.

“Just suicide after suicide lately. It’s ridiculous,” Bennion said.

Owens said the number of deaths is overwhelming kids in the tight-knit community.

“You go to school with these kids and you see them on an everyday basis and they look fine, they seem fine, but you don’t really know what’s going on,” Bennion said.

“There’s a lot of pressure on these kids,” Owens added.

Utah House votes to support $32 million bill that would add more counselors and therapists to schools statewide

Utah House votes to support $32 million bill that would add more counselors and therapists to schools statewide

By Courtney Tanner, The Salt Lake Tribune

A $32 million proposal that would help Utah schools in hiring more therapists passed in the House on Monday despite ongoing concerns about the “pretty big fiscal note.”

HB373 — which has the single largest ongoing funding request for any education measure this session — would spread the money among all public K-12 schools in the state to fund more licensed counselors and nurses, with several districts pointing to a critical shortage. Rep. Steve Eliason, the measure’s sponsor, said it’s specifically intended for schools that have a high number of students who have experienced trauma.

“I believe this is a very important step to help our students who are at risk,” added Eliason, R-Sandy.

The proposed $32 million, still pending final approval, would be given to the Utah Board of Education to run a mental health grant program. To get a share, schools would have to draft a plan based on their needs and prove that they could provide matching funds to improve their services.

The measure comes as Utah’s suicide rate has bumped up almost 50 percent over the past two decades and with youth suicide, in particular, increasing here nearly four times faster than the national average. It is now the leading cause of death for those ages 10 to 17.

In 2018, 39 kids in that age group died by suicide in the state. After lawmakers heard that statistic, the bill passed Monday with a 62-6 vote.

LADY GAGA SHIFTS FOCUS TOWARD MENTAL HEALTH AFTER OSCAR WIN

LADY GAGA SHIFTS FOCUS TOWARD MENTAL HEALTH AFTER OSCAR WIN

BY FIN STAFF, Film Industry Network

After winning the Oscar for Best Original Song, Lady Gaga is shifting her focus towards mental health, seeking to highlight how many people are facing challenges in isolation without others knowing.

Gaga penned a letter to supporters of the Born This Way Foundation, sharing how she had suffered from mental health issues and what it meant for her to have someone to support her, and who could understand what she was going though:

“Talking about mental health is one of the bravest things a person can do. It’s brave to ask for help, to find a way to reach out through the pain and the fear and - all to often - the shame that you’ve been taught to feel. And it’s brave to see someone who’s hurting and to resist the urge to look away, to find the confidence and the words to be there for another human when need they need it the most.

Suicide Prevention - This Week from Senator Crabtree

Suicide Prevention - This Week from Senator Crabtree

3/3/19 Newsletter

As many of you know, Idaho is 4th in the nation for suicides per capita, and our legislative district is first in the state. Idaho has been spending more than a million dollars a year working at this problem. Last year I asked the Department of Health and Welfare for some figures, including the number of lives saved. Health and Welfare didn’t have the data. I believe in accountability in state government. I understand some of you will think the state should not be in the suicide prevention business. However, the program has too much support in the legislature to get rid of. We had to make it better. And accountable.

I required a plan to be written, using private money, that would describe a path to specifically saving lives. If we can’t demonstrate life saving efforts, why are we spending the money?

Healthy Both Inside and Out

Healthy Both Inside and Out

There is still much to be done to address the issue of poor mental health among port workers, finds Kate Jones

Port Strategy

Five years ago, in 2014, port worker Remco Span’s sister committed suicide by jumping in front of a train. Some months later, Remco, now 44, began to experience depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. He works in the Netherlands for a ferry company, in a ferry terminal where there are incoming and outcoming trains for discharging containers to go to the UK, and one day, while working on the rail service, he collapsed.

“I just, in my mind, saw what must have happened,” he reflects.

From that moment, every time Remco had to work on the rail service, he had a negative experience, triggered by the environment in which he was working. Remco is a union representative, meaning he has a closer relationship with his HR manager than other employees, and at one point, she asked Remco how he was doing following the death of his sister. Remco told her about the problems he had been experiencing, and she told him to speak to the company doctor about what he had been going through. In the Netherlands, all businesses have their own doctor.

Atlanta Teens Behind Mental Health "Panic Button" Take on Georgia Legislature

Atlanta Teens Behind Mental Health "Panic Button" Take on Georgia Legislature

"Now I'm not just living for more than myself. Now I have to keep on living."

By Yasmin Tayag,  Inverse

Hannah Lucas was inspired to create an app-based “panic button” in the moment she needed one the most: after a suicide attempt during a difficult battle with depression in her freshman year of high school in Atlanta. Within a year, she and her brother Charlie had created the app notOK, which allows users to instantly alert five trusted contacts at the onset of a mental health crisis. Now, one year after notOK’s launch, she’s hoping to bring what she’s learned about mental health to the Georgia legislature.

“We came up with the idea for the legislation because unfortunately at my school there was this girl around my age who did end up dying by suicide two weeks before Christmas,” Hannah, an energetic, outspoken 17-year-old junior in high school, tells Inverse. With the help of their mother Robin Lucas, Hannah and 14-year-old Charlie are hoping to make mental health first aid certification a necessary part of teaching certification across the state.

Thanks to Lady Gaga, Springfield students will be trained in mental health first aid

Thanks to Lady Gaga, Springfield students will be trained in mental health first aid

By: Claudette Riley, Springfield News-Leader

As a high school counselor, Amy Moran appreciates when teenagers trust her enough to confide their problems.

But, even when they do, she believes she's rarely the first to know.

"Teens are telling teens when there is an issue, when they are struggling," said Moran, who is stationed at Kickapoo High School. "They tell a friend first."

A pilot program aims to train high school students on how to respond — and get help — if they, or a friend, are having mental health issues.

Community Partnership of the Ozarks, in partnership with Springfield Public Schools, will participate in the nation's first teen Mental Health First Aid pilot program. 

First responder PTSD bill resoundingly passes House, goes to governor

First responder PTSD bill resoundingly passes House, goes to governor

By BETSY Z. RUSSELL, Idaho Press

BOISE — A full dozen Idaho House members spoke out in favor of covering first responders’ post-traumatic stress under workers’ compensation on Thursday, as the House passed the bill 59-10 and sent it to the governor’s desk.

As lawmakers debated, the House’s public gallery was filled with Idaho firefighters, watching closely and silently.

Under current law, there’s no coverage unless a first responder with post-traumatic stress also suffers an accompanying physical injury, like “a back injury or an ankle injury,” House Minority Leader Mat Erpelding, D-Boise, the lead sponsor of SB 1028, told the House. “This bill seeks to fix that.”

How to be a good friend and ask R U OK? (K-6)

How to be a good friend and ask R U OK? (K-6)

R U OK?

We're never too young to look out for one another and lend support. While primary school-aged children can't be expected to fix someone’s problems, they can be encouraged to listen to what their friend is saying, show they care and tell a teacher, school counsellor or trusted adult if they are worried about their friend.
That's why we've released a new animation where our friendly character ALEC shows children how to be a good friend and ask "Are you OK." 

Watch now.
More primary school resources here. 

Community Partnership of the Ozarks Selected by Lady Gaga's Foundation to Pilot Program

Community Partnership of the Ozarks Selected by Lady Gaga's Foundation to Pilot Program

By: Beth Finello, OzarksFirst.com

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -  Community Partnership of the Ozarks (CPO), in partnership with Springfield Public Schools, is participating in the country’s first teen Mental Health First Aid (tMHFA) pilot program. CPO was selected as one of eight sites across the country by the National Council for Behavioral Health and Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation who are piloting the course in high schools this spring, making it the first training of its kind developed for high school students in the U.S. The pilot will occur with students at Kickapoo High School this spring.

 tMHFA is an in-person training designed for high school students to learn about mental illnesses and addictions, particularly how to identify and respond to a developing mental health or substance use problem among their peers. Similar to CPR, students learn a 5-step action plan to help their friends who may be facing a mental health problem or crisis, such as suicide.

Bill Would Make Teachers First Responders for Youth in Mental Health Crisis

Bill Would Make Teachers First Responders for Youth in Mental Health Crisis

By Claudia Boyd-Barrett , California Health Report

Noting rising suicide rates and mental health problems among the state’s youth, a bill in the California Senate would require all new teachers to have mental health first-aid training.

State Senators Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) and Anthony Portantino (D-Pasadena) introduced the bill earlier this month with the support of county health officials, mental health program providers and child health advocates. Senate bill 428 would require all new teachers, as well as those renewing their teaching credentials, to complete a course on youth mental health first-aid.

If approved, the requirement would go into effect in January 2020.