Mental Health First Aid

NINE IN 10 YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE US ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THEIR MENTAL HEALTH, FINDS SURVEY

NINE IN 10 YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE US ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THEIR MENTAL HEALTH, FINDS SURVEY

“It's important that particularly young people, but actually everybody knows that everyone breaks. That it’s sort of part of life. That what you have to do at that point is acknowledge it and get help, if you’re lucky enough to be able to get that help. There is no shame in admitting that you can’t cope…ultimately there’s nothing to feel ashamed about. I think particularly with men there is a big feeling that you shouldn’t have these emotions and that you should be able to cope and you should be able to man up…men do have to acknowledge their emotions and they do have to talk about and it’s okay to cry, because you’re a human being.” - Kira Knightley

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Six in 10 of people surveyed admitted to struggling with mental health issues

Katie O'Malley, Independent

Nine in 10 young people in the US are concerned about their mental health, according to a national survey.

Conducted by consulting firm Benenson Strategy Group on behalf Lady Gaga's Born This Way Foundation, researchers undertook at 2,082 online interviews with 13-24 year olds from 28 January to 2 February 2019.

Nearly all those surveyed (88 per cent) said that mental health is a priority concern for them, but one in three felt they lacked reliable access to mental health resources.

The study found that 15 per cent of people said they discuss their mental health “often”, while almost half (49 per cent) admitted to “rarely” or “never” discussing the topic, and more than half (55 per cent) said they were stressed.

Thanks to Lady Gaga, Springfield students will be trained in mental health first aid

Thanks to Lady Gaga, Springfield students will be trained in mental health first aid

By: Claudette Riley, Springfield News-Leader

As a high school counselor, Amy Moran appreciates when teenagers trust her enough to confide their problems.

But, even when they do, she believes she's rarely the first to know.

"Teens are telling teens when there is an issue, when they are struggling," said Moran, who is stationed at Kickapoo High School. "They tell a friend first."

A pilot program aims to train high school students on how to respond — and get help — if they, or a friend, are having mental health issues.

Community Partnership of the Ozarks, in partnership with Springfield Public Schools, will participate in the nation's first teen Mental Health First Aid pilot program. 

Bill Would Make Teachers First Responders for Youth in Mental Health Crisis

Bill Would Make Teachers First Responders for Youth in Mental Health Crisis

By Claudia Boyd-Barrett , California Health Report

Noting rising suicide rates and mental health problems among the state’s youth, a bill in the California Senate would require all new teachers to have mental health first-aid training.

State Senators Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) and Anthony Portantino (D-Pasadena) introduced the bill earlier this month with the support of county health officials, mental health program providers and child health advocates. Senate bill 428 would require all new teachers, as well as those renewing their teaching credentials, to complete a course on youth mental health first-aid.

If approved, the requirement would go into effect in January 2020.